The Washington Post

‘Bible literacy’ classes in public schools violate separation of church and state

‘Bible literacy’ classes in public schools violate separation of church and state

As one of the most consequential books of all time, the Bible is certainly worthy of study for its literary and historic importance. Indeed, the Supreme Court asserted that in its landmark 1963 Abington ruling, which outlawed the practice of public schools reading the Bible as part of morning prayers. Academic study, though, is clearly not the aim of conservative Christian activists who have undertaken a nationwide push for Bible classes in public schools. That they have been emboldened by Donald Trump’s presidency and seem to be succeeding should be of concern to anyone who values the separation of church and state enshrined in the Constitution.

A conservative Christian group is pushing Bible classes in public schools nationwide — and it’s working

A conservative Christian group is pushing Bible classes in public schools nationwide — and it’s working

Activists on the religious right, through their legislative effort Project Blitz, drafted a law that encourages Bible classes in public schools and persuaded at least 10 state legislatures to introduce versions of it this year. Georgia and Arkansas recently passed bills that are awaiting their governors’ signatures.

President Trump just tweeted support for Bible courses, but it’s already legal to teach about the Bible

President Trump just tweeted support for Bible courses, but it’s already legal to teach about the Bible

Bible courses in public schools appeared to get a high-visibility boost Monday when President Trump tweeted about a group of states proposing such classes. “Starting to make a turn back? Great!” he tweeted. As a Bible scholar, I’d join with the president in affirming the value of a good grasp of the Good Book.